(Environmental Data)Yamaha Group(1)

Yamaha Corporation and Group Manufacturing Companies in Japan

CO2 Emissions (from energy consumption)

  CO2 emissions of the Yamaha Group in Japan declined by 1,000 tons of CO2 compared with the previous fiscal year to 60,100 tons of CO2 in fiscal 2013. This was 45% lower than levels recorded in fiscal 1990, and largely exceeded our fiscal 2010 objective of 6%. In addition to a host of measures encompassing the integration of headquarters factory grand piano manufacturing processes to the Kakegawa Factory and the integration of wind instrument manufacturing plants in Saitama to the Toyooka Factory, this result is largely attributable to the drop in production volume due mainly to the sale of certain businesses and deterioration in the economic environment.

  In addition, CO2 emissions per unit of sales were 24.2 tons of CO2 per ¥100 million, an increase of 1.5% compared with the previous fiscal year.

CO2 Emissions (from energy consumption)

CO2 Emissions (from energy consumption)

Non-CO2 Greenhouse Gas Emissions*1

  Emissions of greenhouse gases other than CO2 were 7,400 tons in fiscal 2013, a 500 ton increase compared with the previous fiscal year. The major factor behind this increase was a change in the type of gas consumption owing to a change in production item.

  • *1 Primarily sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and perfluorocarbons (PFCs)

Non-CO2 Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Non-CO2 Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Breakdown of Energy Consumption

  Energy use in fiscal 2013 fell 2 TJ compared with the previous fiscal year to 745TJ.

  Electricity and gas (city gas, LPG, LNG) accounts for 89% of the total.

Breakdown of Energy Consumption

Breakdown of Energy Consumption

Amount of HCFCs Used

  By the end of 1993, the Yamaha Group in Japan stopped using specified CFCs in an effort to protect the ozone layer. The Group then worked to reduce the amount of HCFC used as washing agents in metal cleaning processes, eliminating their use completely in fiscal 2005.

NOx (nitrogen oxide) Emissions

  NOx is generated by the burning of fuels such as heavy oil, coke and LPG. In fiscal 2013, Yamaha Group NOx emissions in Japan were on par with the previous fiscal year at 28.7 tons.

NOx (Nitrogen Oxide) Emissions

NOx (Nitrogen Oxide) Emissions

SOx(sulfur oxide) Emissions

  SOx is generated primarily through the burning of heavy oil, coke, and other fuels. Because the sulfur content of fuel contributes to these emissions, the Yamaha Group in Japan has adopted low-sulfur fuels. In fiscal 2013, emissions were on par with the previous fiscal year at 14.3 tons.

SOx (Sulfur Oxide) Emissions

SOx (Sulfur Oxide) Emissions

Complying with the PRTR*3 Law

  In fiscal 2013, the Yamaha Group handled a total of 303 tons of substances designated under the PRTR Law, about the same amount as the previous fiscal year. Emissions released into the environment were on par with the previous fiscal year at 48 tons.

  Of the 48 tons released into the environment, about 80% comprises styrene, toluene and xylene from painting processes. Going forward, Yamaha will continue efforts to reduce VOC emissions.

  • *3 PRTR: An abbreviation for Pollutant Release and Transfer Register.
    The PRTR Law is an abbreviation of the Law Concerning Reporting, etc. of Releases to the Environment of Specific Chemical Substances and Promoting Improvements in their Management.

Amount of PRTR-designated Substances Released

Amount of PRTR-designated Substances Released

  • * Values in previous fiscal years were revised.
Yamaha Group PRTR Results (FY2013: Japan)(tons)
Class 1 Designated Chemical Substances Total amount handled Amount released into the environment Amount transferred Others
Order Ordinance No. Substance name Into air Into public water Into soil Buried on facility premises Waste transferred To sewerage system Consumption, products, etc.
1 240 styrene 220.4 19.8 0.0 0.0 0.0 2.2 0.0 198.4
2 300 toluene 14.3 14.2 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.0 0.0
3 374 hydrogen fluoride and its water-soluble salts 11.8 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 11.8
4 438 methylnaphthalene 10.6 0.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 10.6
5 232 N,N-dimethylformamide 9.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 2.9 0.0 6.2
6 20 2-aminoethanol 6.3 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 5.9 0.0 0.3
7 80 xylene 4.9 4.6 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.2 0.0 0.0
8 420 methyl methacrylate 4.0 3.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.9
9 384 1-bromopropane 3.0 2.3 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.7
10 53 ethylbenzene 2.7 2.7 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
11 309 nickel compounds 2.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.2 0.0 1.9
12 308 nickel 1.9 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.9
13 71 ferric chloride 1.6 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.6
14 354 di-n-butyl phthalate 1.4 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.0 0.0 0.4
15 144 inorganic cyanide compounds (except complex salts and cyanates) 1.2 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.2
16 407 poly(oxyethylene)alkyl ether(alkyl C=12-15) 1.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.1
17 134 vinyl acetate 0.8 0.8 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1
18 87 chromium and chromium(III) compounds 0.8 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.8 0.0 0.0
19 82 silver and its water-soluble compounds 0.7 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.7
20 132 cobalt and its compounds poly(oxyethylene) nonylphenyl ether 0.6 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.6
21 276 3,6,9-triazaundecane -1,11-diamine poly(oxyethylene)alkyl ether(alkyl C=12-15) 0.6 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.4 0.0 0.2
22 297 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene 0.5 0.5 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
23 395 water-soluble salts of peroxodisulfuric acid 0.3 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.3
24 88 chromium(VI) compounds 0.3 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.3
25 448 methylenebis(4,1-phenylene) diisocyanate 0.2 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.2
26 349 phenol 0.2 0.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1
27 333 hydrazine 0.2 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.2
28 411 formaldehyde 0.2 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.2
29 258 1,3,5,7-tetraazatricyclo [3.3.1.13.7]decane 0.2 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.2
30 405 boron compounds 0.2 0.0 0.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
31 76 epsilon-caprolactam 0.2 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.2 0.0 0.0
32 59 ethylenediamine n-hexane 0.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1
33 410 poly(oxyethylene) nonylphenyl ether 0.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1
Others 0.6 0.2 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.2 0.0 0.3
Total 303.3 48.3 0.1 0.0 0.0 14.2 0.0 240.8

Note: The above list includes those of the 462 Class 1 substances that Yamaha handled in a volume of 0.1 tons or greater.
In some cases the total values may appear not to match due to rounding of numbers.

VOCs (Volatile Organic Compounds) Atmospheric Emissions

  The Yamaha Group is working to reduce the emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released during product coating, adhesion and other processes. VOCs, which include a wide range of substances such as toluene, xylene and ethyl acetate, are believed to be one of the sources of air pollutants such as optical oxidants and suspended particulate matter.

  In fiscal 2006, the Yamaha Group formed a working group to address VOC emissions reduction, conducted studies of VOC use and emission at each business site and investigated methods for reducing emissions. As a result of working to meet our goal of a 30% reduction in emissions compared to fiscal 2000 levels by fiscal 2010, we were able to reduce emissions by some 70%.

VOC Atmospheric Emissions

VOC Atmospheric Emissions

  • * Values in previous fiscal years were revised.

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